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Duel

Eye to eye stand winners and losers…

This episode begins on a planet where a figure carved out of rock forms a very striking centrepiece.

Sue: It’s the sort of statue that you’d see outside a football stadium. Is it a goal celebration?

Me: No, it’s Yohan Cabaye tearing up his Newcastle United contract.

An old lady named Giroc has been summoned to this monument.

Sue: The Sisters of Karn have really let themselves go.

Giroc joins a younger woman named Sinofar, who has materialised out of thin air.

DuelSue: It must be freezing on this planet.

Me: Because her face is blue?

Sue: I’m not talking about her face. Neil. Stop pretending that you can’t see them.

Me: Yeah… I definitely remember this episode.

Sue: I bet you bloody do! She may as well have not got dressed.

There’s plenty of exposition in this scene and Sue tries to keep up.

Sue: OK, so the old woman is the Keeper. Are you sure this isn’t football related?

Meanwhile, on the flight deck of a Federation pursuit ship…

Sue: Oh good, it’s Travie.

Me: Travie? He’s a bad ass Space Commander, not a bloody dog!

The ship is piloted by two Mutoids.

Sue: Lady Gaga must have seen this episode. She wore a hat like that once, although I think it was made out of bacon.

Travis has pursued Blake across several galaxies.

DuelSue: It’s nice of him to hold the microphone like that. It saves the crew having to struggle with a boom in such a cramped set.

Meanwhile, on the Liberator, Jenna scans the alien planet below.

Sue: I like her space dress. Ooh, and that was a lovely focus pull. Who directed this?

Me: You tell me.

Sue: Is it Douglas Camfield?

She shoots, she scores. However, given that Douglas Camfield is the only Doctor Who director she can remember the name of, and there’s a photograph of him hanging in our kitchen, I guessed this would happen.

Me: Well done. OK, so if this is Douglas Camfield that means something else is different about this episode. Have you spotted it yet?

Sue: Yes, this one is quite good.

Me: No, something else. Come on, it’s obvious.

Sue: It’s the music. The music is different. This isn’t Dudley.

Me: And why is that?

DuelSue: Because Douglas hated Dudley’s guts. Something to do with a champagne bottle, wasn’t it?

Vila accuses Avon of being a machine, which Avon takes as a compliment.

Sue: Either Avon wants to shag Vila or he wants to kill him; he can’t make his mind up.

On the Federation pursuit ship, the Mutoid pilot recharges her plasma supply.

Mutoid: Opponents of Mutoid modification call us vampires.

Sue: Space vampires? Really? Brilliant.

She isn’t being sarcastic. Honest.

Sue: I’m well into this. Even the model shots look good. And I’m sorry, Dudley, I really am, but this music is a huge improvement. It’s really atmospheric instead of parp-parp-parp-maracas.

Blake, Jenna and Gan, oblivious to the threat posed by Travis, decide to explore the alien planet.

Sue: This place is obviously made from polystyrene in a pokey studio in Television Centre, but Douglas is getting away with it. I’ve seen a lot worse. There’s wind and everything. It’s nicely lit, too. It’s a shame they didn’t use film, though. This is when you need film, not when you’re standing in an empty room.

DuelGan spies Federation ships in the sky above them.

Sue: Classic Camfield three-shot. Lovely.

Sinofar also strikes a pose.

Sue: Her dress looks like it’s been painted on.

Me: She’s Isla Blair.

Sue: From the Generation Game?

Me: No, Isla Blair from the Royal Shakespeare Company. She’s married to Julian Glover.

Sue: That name rings a bell.

Me: He’s the randy old priest who gets his knackers out on Game of Thrones.

Sue: Oh yes. Well done him.

Vila sounds the alarm on the Liberator, and Avon nearly skids off the set.

Sue: That was brilliant.

DuelI pause the DVD.

Me: Have you forgiven Avon for punching a woman in the face yet?

Sue: He’s on probation.

Me: Some Blake’s 7 fans think you were a bit sexist for complaining about Avon smacking a woman in the face. Double-standards and all that.

Sue: They can **** off.

Me: They claim that Avon was well within his rights because Sara was trying to kill him.

Sue: She was unarmed when he punched her, so that’s completely wrong for a start. Look, he’s a bad lad. I get it. It doesn’t mean I have to like it, especially when there’s no need for it and he really enjoyed it. I love the way Avon runs, though, so can we just get on with it, please?

The Federation are closing in…

Blake: Maximum speed and range?

Jenna: Standard by four, about eight million spacials.

DuelSue: That’s about half a mile. Seriously though, this is excellent. It’s Das Boot in Space.

While the Liberator is bombarded by plasma bolts, Blake uses state of the art technology to work out his tactics.

Sue: I’m sure they’ve nicked that from Match of the Day. Are you absolutely sure this isn’t about football?

Avon isn’t convinced by Blake’s plan of attack.

Blake: Have you got any better ideas?

A violent explosion throws Blake into Avon’s arms.

Sue: (as Avon) We could have a cuddle while we wait to die, if you like.

Me: Stop that, please.

Blake prepares to ram Travis’s ship. And then everything grinds to a halt. Sue thinks there’s something wrong with the DVD, but when she realises that it’s all part of the plot, she gives me the thumbs up. In slo-mo of course.

Sue: I don’t think ramming the ship is a such a good idea. The Liberator‘s pointy bits will snap off.

When the two ships are a million spatials apart (about an inch), Blake and Travis begin screaming in agony.

DuelSue: OK, it’s gone a bit mad, now. I don’t have a clue what’s going on any more, but it’s going on for ages.

When normality is resumed – Sue says she could have made a cup of tea in the time it took – Giroc’s voice echoes through both ships.

Giroc: Your ship is tethered, held in a stasis beam, it cannot break free. Only your life support systems will function normally, the rest will remain in our control, until we have completed our task.

Sue: I didn’t understand a word of that. Did she forget to put her teeth in?

Blake and Travis find themselves on the alien planet with Sinofar and Giroc.

Sue: Oh, I see. The old woman is Yoda and the woman with practically nothing on is Q from Star Trek. I get it now.

Travis tells his hosts why he hates Blake.

Travis: This man is an enemy of the state and a fugitive.

Sue: You left out child molester. If you really want them to be on your side, start with child molester.

Travis’s response excites Giroc.

Sue: Are there only two woman left on this planet?

Me: Yes.

DuelSue: If I were Blake, I’d be saying “I don’t fancy yours much, Travis” at this point.

Giroc: Tell us, what is your dispute?

Travis: I have told you. This man is an enemy of the Federation, tried and convicted.

Sue: Just say it. He’s on the sex offender register.

Giroc appears on the Liberator‘s scanner to explain the offside rule to the rest of the crew.

Sue: She’s definitely got a William Hartnell vibe going on here.

Blake and Travis will fight each other to the death, but a friend will be sent to keep them company, which means Jenna also vanishes from the flight deck.

Sue: Thank God they didn’t send Vila. Blake would be dead in seconds.

Blake finds himself in a forest.

Sue: This looks great, but I bet it would look even better in widescreen.

Burn the heretic!

Sue: This is basically the The Hunger Games of its day. But with space vampires and magic wizards.

Giroc sends Blake into a tizzy.

Sue: That’s the best directed mind-**** I’ve ever seen. That was brilliant. Douglas was wasted on television.

Blake’s remaining crew monitor events from the comfort of the Liberator‘s coffee lounge.

DuelSue: I’m surprised Gan hasn’t got a tub of popcorn on his lap.

And then something terrible happens.

Sue: Oh no! Bad chromakey.

It appears that Douglas had to cobble together some pick-ups in the studio.

Sue: Either the episode was running short or something went horribly wrong on location. Poor Douglas. Oh well, he’s only human. What he did film looks great.

Blake sharpens some branches with his knife.

Sue: They’ll come in handy against the space vampire. Good thinking, Blake.

When night falls, Blake and Jenna hide in a tree.

Sue: Blake and Jenna sitting in a tree, K-I-S-S-I-N-G.

Me: Stop it. Just stop it.

Sue: What?

DuelMe: Stop shipping.

Sue: Shipping? What the **** are you talking about?

I explain the basic concept of shipping to her.

Sue: Is it called shipping because they have sex on space ships?

Me: Yes, that’s exactly why they call it shipping. Now please stop it.

Meanwhile, Travis and a Mutoid are also sitting in a tree, but there no sexual tension. Instead, Travis passes the time by tormenting his companion.

Travis: I know who you were. Your name was Keyeira.

Sue: You were named after an exotic orange flavoured drink from the 20th century. It’s a very silly name.

Blake is attacked by a bat. Yes, a bat!

Sue: Oh dear. Douglas was definitely having a bad day. It can happen to anyone.

Avon is bored senseless and decides to go to bed.

Avon: Blake is sitting up in a tree, Travis is sitting up in another tree. Unless they’re planning to throw nuts at one another, I don’t see much of a fight developing before it gets light.

Sue: OK, I forgive him.

Morning arrives and the second half kicks off.

DuelSue: So, is Blake a vampire now? What are the chances of that? He gets turned into a vampire on a planet with a vampire on it, but he isn’t bitten by the vampire, he’s bitten by a random bat. That’s just bad luck. And speaking of bad luck, here’s some more bad chroma. It probably rained. That must be it. It looks like it’s been raining. Poor Douglas.

Blake climbs another tree.

Sue: Yes, they are definitely losing light in this scene. What a shame. They should put the floodlights on.

Jenna is abducted by the Mutoid so Travis can use her as bait. The Mutoid wants to snack on Jenna, but Travis won’t allow it.

Sue: She doesn’t get any sexual gratification when she drinks blood. It’s all done mechanically. That’s a bit shit; I wouldn’t want to be a space vampire.

Travis draws Blake out.

Travis: I have your friend. Your friend will die, Blake, unless you give yourself up.

Sue: Has the actor who plays Travis been in anything else?

Me: Loads of stuff.

Eat your heart out, Toby Hadoke.

DuelSue: He’s really good. I like him a lot. Wouldn’t it be great if Travis had a change of heart and joined Blake’s crew? He’d fit right in.

Travis springs his trap, but the hungry Mutoid makes a right pig’s ear of it and Travis and Blake end up fighting to the death.

Me: This sounds like Tangerine Dream.

Sue: Everything sounds like Tangerine Dream to you.

I’m serious. Listen to the soundtrack to ‘Duel’:

And then listen to this snippet from Tangerine Dream’s seminal 1973 album, Atem:

Me: It’s uncanny.

Sue: Whatever.

Sue couldn’t care less; she’s enjoying the testosterone-fuelled fight too much. Blake finally gets the upper hand but he refuses to kill his nemesis in cold blood.

Sue: That act of kindness will set Blake and Jenna free. It’s a bit obvious, but they did it quite well.

Sue is quite right: Sinofar sets Blake free, accepting that his encounter with Travis was a score draw.

Sue: Perhaps Blake should drop kick the old woman in the face before he leaves. You know, just to be “edgy”. She did try to get him killed after all. And she’s armed with a big stick, so he could call it self defence. No?

The Liberator breaks orbit.

Sue: I wish we could see the ship go VROOOOOOOOM! like they do on Star Trek. Never mind.

DuelThe episode concludes with Travis continuing his hunt for Blake.

Travis: He made one fatal error. He should have killed me.

Sue: That’s twice now. I think Blake has a soft spot for Travie.

Me: STOP IT!

Cue credits.

The Score:

Sue: That was more like it! Why can’t they all be like that? Just let Douglas Camfield direct every episode; it isn’t rocket science. What I really liked about this episode was that you learnt quite a bit about Travis and Blake as characters. It’s a good set-up for the future. It looked great too, although I’ll have to knock a mark off for the bad chroma. And even though the script was a bit clunky at times, I really, really enjoyed it.

9/10

Next Time:

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50 comments

  • January 28, 2014 11:15 amPosted 3 years ago
    Philip Ayres

    “Hurt by envy, cut by greed”

    Personally I prefer the Jeweled version off Wishful Thinking

  • January 28, 2014 11:22 amPosted 3 years ago
    Adam Whitehead

    “He’s the randy old priest who gets his knackers out on Game of Thrones.”

    No reference to his several DOCTOR WHO roles? 🙂

    • January 28, 2014 11:34 amPosted 3 years ago
      John Callaghan

      Neil was quoting from Julian Glover’s CV, Adam.

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        January 28, 2014 6:15 pmPosted 3 years ago
        Simon Harries

        Hahaha! I just spat my tea out across the work computer… 🙂

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    January 28, 2014 11:35 amPosted 3 years ago
    Dave Sanders

    A punch-the-air moment from Sue with her second line, that’s *got* to be a record. 🙂

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    January 28, 2014 11:48 amPosted 3 years ago
    Dave Sanders

    Nobody’s going to say Avon was a sucker-punch for a pretty face? No? Oh well, sod it then.

    I call this episode ‘Feud’. I don’t need to elaborate why.

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      January 28, 2014 11:51 amPosted 3 years ago
      Dave Sanders

      We also had a better duel/feud to watch on Twitter last night. Neil knows exactly what I mean. 🙂

      • January 28, 2014 8:45 pmPosted 3 years ago
        encyclops

        Not the Joss Whedon one?

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          January 28, 2014 11:14 pmPosted 3 years ago
          Dave Sanders

          Nope – the Marco Polo ‘hoax’ that nobody claims to have believed, but didn’t stop Ian Levine being… well, Ian Levine.

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    January 28, 2014 12:35 pmPosted 3 years ago
    John Miller

    Sue: Perhaps Blake should drop kick the old woman in the face before he leaves. You know, just to be “edgy”. She did try to get him killed after all. And she’s armed with a big stick, so he could call it self-defence. No?

    Haha 🙂

    Considering Sue got the other Star Trek rip offs, it’s a bit strange she never picked up that the “you would make a great machine” line was a direct lift from a conversation between Kirk and Spock(only Kirk said ‘computer” rather than ‘machine’) and this whole episode is basically “Arena”, only with less action.

    And those shipping comments have no doubt buggered up the minds of many who read this…

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      January 28, 2014 5:58 pmPosted 3 years ago
      Frankymole

      Of course, as pointed out in several articles on the trope, “Arena” was a rip-off of many previous versions going right back to Greek myth…

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    January 28, 2014 12:52 pmPosted 3 years ago
    Mike

    Within the first few minutes, she mentions the Sisterhood of Karn, recognises a Camfield and can recollect the epic Camfield/Dudley spat of the 1970s.

    Sue, you’ve turned to the Dark Side.

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      January 28, 2014 3:41 pmPosted 3 years ago
      Nick Mays

      Okay, I thought I knew most of the beheind-the-scenes malarky. What was the Douggie/Dudley spat about? Was champagne involved?

      • January 28, 2014 6:28 pmPosted 3 years ago
        John Callaghan

        Actually, it was the inspiration for this episode. We’re actually watching the dramatisation of events that happened at that party. Douglas is Blake, I think, and Dudley is possibly the mutoid.

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          January 28, 2014 6:39 pmPosted 3 years ago
          Nick Mays

          You-you mean… they were together in a tree? And Dudley used to be a woman? 😮

          • January 28, 2014 7:03 pmPosted 3 years ago
            John Callaghan

            Yes – a little-known secret revealed when we consider that his name is an anagram of “dude – ly”. “Ly” is obviously a phonetic rendition of “lie”, indicating that his male status is a charade.

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    January 28, 2014 1:03 pmPosted 3 years ago
    rob

    One of my fave eppys from a so-so Season 1 and had a feeling that Sue would enjoy this one 🙂

  • January 28, 2014 1:11 pmPosted 3 years ago
    Dubbin Leatherfood

    Phew, 9/10, I thought we were losing Sue for a bit there. I do think Season 1 is the leg-work for the rest of the show, but it’s good to have these highlights along the way. This is probably the Season 1 episode I watch the most.

    Giroc and Sinofar bother me, though. I’ve a particular aversion to cackling old crones, they give me the hump.

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      January 28, 2014 6:17 pmPosted 3 years ago
      Simon Harries

      At least Patsy Smart never said, “Make an ‘orse sick that would, corrrr!” in this episode. Although that might have made things even better!

      • January 29, 2014 11:34 amPosted 3 years ago
        Dubbin Leatherfood

        Her shiny chin bothers me too. It’s like she can’t control her saliva.

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    January 28, 2014 1:21 pmPosted 3 years ago
    solar penguin

    “Either Avon wants to shag Vila or he wants to kill him; he can’t make his mind up.”

    Not just Vila. That pretty much sums up Avon’s relationship with everyone!

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      January 28, 2014 3:35 pmPosted 3 years ago
      Nick Mays

      Brilliant line as ever from Sue though! 🙂

    • January 28, 2014 8:44 pmPosted 3 years ago
      encyclops

      My god, you’re right!

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      January 29, 2014 11:54 amPosted 3 years ago
      The Grouchybeast

      Also, it’s Blakes 7. That is not an either-or question.

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      May 11, 2014 3:55 pmPosted 3 years ago
      Fiona

      He sure holds onto Blake a long time…

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    January 28, 2014 1:22 pmPosted 3 years ago
    Chris Bryant

    “Bears a uncanny resemblance to Soolin.” I swear you said exactly the same thing when introducing Project Avalon on UK Gold! Long memory, me.

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    January 28, 2014 2:00 pmPosted 3 years ago
    Dave Sanders

    Somebody create a B7: Duel mashup where Blake is overdubbed with Ian Levine and Travis is everyone else on Twitter. One of the Scottish Falsetto Socks can play that bit.

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    January 28, 2014 3:39 pmPosted 3 years ago
    Nick Mays

    “Travis: I know who you were. Your name was Keyeira.

    Sue: You were named after an exotic orange flavoured drink from the 20th century. It’s a very silly name.”

    Brilliant!

    As is:

    “Avon: Blake is sitting up in a tree, Travis is sitting up in another tree. Unless they’re planning to throw nuts at one another, I don’t see much of a fight developing before it gets light.”

    Classic! 🙂

  • January 28, 2014 6:01 pmPosted 3 years ago
    Phill P

    Glad Sue is liking these, or at least some of them. The thing about Blakes 7 that I love the most is the subverting of our expectations, especially with Blake and Avon.

    Blake is set up as the rebel wronged by a corrupt system, the champion of the people, the defender of the underdog and all round hero. Yet as time goes on he becomes more fanatical and ruthless, obsessed with the fight against the Federation, and stops caring about who gets hurt along the way. You can see the signs even this early on.

    By contrast Avon is set up as the self serving amoral mercenary type, cold and aloof and sarcastic, yet it is Avon who time and time again helps or rescues people even when there is nothing in it for him. He’s actually more selfless, and therefore more of a hero than Blake.

    Blakes 7 was the first programme for me that ever tried to challenge those stereotypes.

    Moral of the story? Heroes aren’t always nice guys with a cause to fight who are always in the spotlight. Sometimes they’re just the guy trying to do his job, but who would rather not see anyone else hurt.

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      January 28, 2014 11:23 pmPosted 3 years ago
      Dave Sanders

      I’m surprised Sue didn’t respond to Avon’s slightly mocking, slightly approving shake of the head, knowing that Blake will refuse to kill and thus pass the test, even as all the other crewmates around him bay for blood. It’s the moment for me that defines Avon as the rational one, rather than any dialogue.

      • January 30, 2014 6:43 pmPosted 3 years ago
        Phill P

        I suppose it does at that. Although I am pretty sure both Avon and Blake would have killed Travis if it wasn’t a test of mercy.

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    January 28, 2014 7:09 pmPosted 3 years ago
    Richard Lyth

    Some hilarious comments from Sue this week – my favourite was “If I were Blake, I’d be saying “I don’t fancy yours much, Travis” at this point”. Great to see her really enjoying an episode for once, hopefully it won’t be too long before that happens again.

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    January 28, 2014 8:01 pmPosted 3 years ago
    Sally M

    Yay! So glad Sue likes this one.

    “Avon: Blake is sitting up in a tree, Travis is sitting up in another tree. Unless they’re planning to throw nuts at one another, I don’t see much of a fight developing before it gets light.” … this would be the point where a lot of folk fell for Avon 🙂

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      May 11, 2014 3:59 pmPosted 3 years ago
      Fiona

      But he best bit of that is where Vila and Gan insult him for being cold-blooded: “You’re never involved, are you, Avon?…have you ever cared for anyone, except yourself?” and Avon says “I have never seen why it is necessary to be irrational to prove you care, or indeed, why it is necessary to prove it, at all” and Vila says “Was that an insult, or did I miss something?” and Cally says “You missed something”.
      Ahhh. Cute. He does care.
      I just realized I quoted all that from memory and therefore need to get out more.

  • January 28, 2014 8:27 pmPosted 3 years ago
    encyclops

    As good as Sue’s lines are, I think Neil actually wins this round.

    I explain the basic concept of shipping to her.

    Oh, I would have LOVED to hear that explanation.

    Blake is attacked by a bat. Yes, a bat!

    It was a trauma he’d suffered as a sboolboy.

    Eat your heart out, Toby Hadoke.

    Fantastic.

    For some reason I remember really disliking this episode on most recent rewatch. I think it’s that the device to get Blake and Travis in this situation is so contrived and woo-woo mystical. Sheer dresses aside, I can’t help feeling that there would have been much less cheesy ways to set this up that didn’t rely on Q-like omnipotence.

    I do quite like the Mutoids, though, not least because it’s nice to see a female caste of warriors in the mix, even though it’s probably because they’re nice to look at. The stuff between Travis and his Mutoid is probably what I like best about this one. And the direction and music, too, I suppose.

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      January 28, 2014 8:40 pmPosted 3 years ago
      Frankymole

      Travis has two mutoids on his crew. One of them male… presumably for the other 50% of the audience to have someone nice to look at?

      • January 28, 2014 8:43 pmPosted 3 years ago
        encyclops

        Ah, yes, I couldn’t remember if there were male Mutoids. They must not have cast cute enough males or I would have remembered them both.

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    January 28, 2014 9:06 pmPosted 3 years ago
    wyngatecarpenter

    For some reason I imagine this episode being redone as a 70s Marvel comic, Blake and Travis fighting to the death for the enjoyment of mystical beings with lots of swirly psychadelic stuff floating around.
    This episode is great up until the ramming Travis’s ship scene, and then the space witches intervene and waffle on for ages and it doesn’t quite recover. Does ayone else think that Travis would have no hope of killing anything with that trap?
    And why is Blake willing to drop his feud with Travis after this fight? It’s not as if the small matter of Travis being a Fedreation officer sent to hunt him down would suddently disappear. And why doesn’t he kill him? Anyway, good episode, just not quite a great one

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    January 28, 2014 10:53 pmPosted 3 years ago
    Mat Dolphin

    Great episode, very atmospheric with intriguing character moments.

  • January 28, 2014 11:26 pmPosted 3 years ago
    encyclops

    And credit where credit is due: the Holmesian double act on these trailers is just sublime.

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    January 29, 2014 3:30 amPosted 3 years ago
    John S. Hall

    Just think — if Douglas Camfield had cast Beatrix Lehmann instead of Patsy Smart, there could have been two sets of nipples on display… 😉

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    January 29, 2014 12:07 pmPosted 3 years ago
    The Grouchybeast

    I love this episode. It’s the epitome of dysfunctional team-building weekends in the woods.

    > Me: Stop that, please.

    You might as well give up, really. There’s no getting away from it. Blakes 7 is one of the very few shows where I can look at the TV and actually say, yeah, I’m definitely seeing the slash subtext there. Blakes 7, and DS9. Okay, and maybe 1980s Robin of Sherwood, too. But that’s it!

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    January 30, 2014 8:39 amPosted 3 years ago
    Sean Alexander

    Time to mention the elephant in the room: this is Star Trek’s ‘Arena’ but with Travis playing the Gorn.

    And who the hell designed those ‘swords’? I’ve seen better in kids’ pantos.

    Is this the only episode that doesn’t feature the teleport theme-tune?

    Terry Nation has written all 7 episodes so far and it’s starting to show. Another civilization destroyed by nuclear war…

    And best supporting character goes to Isla Blair’s nipples. Both of them.

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      January 30, 2014 10:16 amPosted 3 years ago
      John Miller

      Time to mention the elephant in the room: this is Star Trek’s ‘Arena’ but with Travis playing the Gorn.

      That’s already been mentioned.

      But apparently it’s Terry Nation’s superior take on Star Trek. Just as the Blake’s 7 Federation is supposedly a more realistic take than the Star trek Federation, then Blake sitting up a tree is a more realistic take on Arena.

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      January 30, 2014 11:07 amPosted 3 years ago
      Dave Sanders

      The Way Back doesn’t for obvious reasons, and neither do Space Fall or Rescue.

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      January 30, 2014 7:53 pmPosted 3 years ago
      Frankymole

      The “swords” are machetes.

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    February 3, 2014 12:09 amPosted 3 years ago
    DPC

    9/10…

    **YES!**

    “Duel” is definitely a highlight – great story, great acting, great direction… great threats of throwing nuts at one another… yes, it’s influenced by Trek’s “Arena”. Which is nice because “Arena” was such a two dimensional piece, made alive given a twist to the premise.

    Even the one line about chasing Blake into “this galaxy” doesn’t wreck it…

    And, yeah, the lack of teleport “wants to be majestic but ends up sounding like campfest ’78” music adds the sort of feel that B7 needed more of.

    I do hope sue likes “Breakdown”, if for no reason other than the acting…

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    March 4, 2014 4:29 amPosted 3 years ago
    Graeme

    “Sue: She was unarmed when he punched her, so that’s completely wrong for a start. ”

    She was armed until Avon disarmed her. Also he decked her right after she elbowed him in the chest trying to break loose. It was either deck or shoot her,

    “…so can we just get on with it, please?”

    Oh! Sue is struggling!”

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    March 4, 2014 4:49 amPosted 3 years ago
    Graeme

    “Avon: Blake is sitting up in a tree, Travis is sitting up in another tree. Unless they’re planning to throw nuts at one another, I don’t see much of a fight developing before it gets light.

    Sue: OK, I forgive him.’

    One classic line from Avon and he’s is off probation from ‘needlessly’ striking a girl.
    Accused child molester – NIL!

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    May 11, 2014 4:01 pmPosted 3 years ago
    Fiona

    Why was Travis so unbelievably dumb as to render his Mutoid companion useless by not letting her drink blood? She kept telling him she was going to faint or whatever. And then he blamed her and ordered a court-martial!

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